A screenshoot of a YouTube video announcing Elvis Costello's new album "Spanish Model."

Elvis Costello’s ‘Spanish Model’ brings back rock-and-roll classics to a Spanish-speaking audience

Grammy award-winning musician Elvis Costello has a new album, but you won't hear his voice on it. This time, it’s a remix featuring voices from across the Spanish-singing world.

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A screenshoot of a YouTube video announcing Elvis Costello's new album "Spanish Model."

Via YouTube

Grammy-award winning musician Elvis Costello has a new album, but you won't hear his voice on it. 

The new release, titled “Spanish Model,” is a remix of the English artist’s 1978 “This Year’s Model,” but reimagined by an assortment of stars from the world of Spanish rock music, such as Colombia's Juanes and Sebastian Yatra, Argentina’s Fito Paez, Chile’s Cami and Puerto Rico’s Luis Fonsi.

"...[S]o much music that I love has rebounded back and forth between different continents."

Elvis Costello

“[Singer] Nick Lowe says a very smart thing: ‘Spanish is the other language in which rock-and-roll sounds great,’” Costello said. “And so much music that I love has rebounded back and forth between different continents."

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“Spanish Model,” in which Costello worked with producer Sebastian Krys, a multi-Grammy-award-winner, added no new music to the original tracks — just small arrangements to allow for the creativity of the guest artists.

Colombian singer and songwriter Juanes recorded a version of Costello’s 1978 track “Pump it up,” with its sarcastic lyrics and stomping rhythms that reached number 24 in the UK charts. 

Chilean singer Cami recorded "This Year's Girl," written by Costello, and performed by Costello and The Attractions.

"What's interesting about this, and has its own charm and width, is hearing all of these different singers take on the story of the songs and also, not just singing a literal translation, but singing an adaptation, and sometimes being as bold as to change the story or change the emphasis of the story."

Elvis Costello

"What's interesting about this, and has its own charm and width, is hearing all of these different singers take on the story of the songs and also, not just singing a literal translation, but singing an adaptation, and sometimes being as bold as to change the story or change the emphasis of the story," Costello said.

The album keeps the original instrumental trademarks, like the organ and the beat, giving crossover listeners the chance to recognize the original songs. Costello said the instrumental mix worked with the voice of the artists in a different way, bringing a new perspective into how the band, The Attractions, sounds.

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“It allowed the band to actually sound even more powerful, in some cases, because I wasn't taking up so much space with all my attitude,” Costello said.

For Krys, the new album was an opportunity to expose Costello’s music to a new audience — and a brand new generation — in an innovative way.

“...It didn't feel like a period piece, it felt modern to me,” Krys said. “It could have been recorded yesterday, except that no one plays like that anymore.”