Galapagos islands' Wolf volcano erupts — rare pink iguanas not in danger

The World
The Wolf volcano spews smoke and lava on Isabela Island, May 25.

The Wolf volcano spews smoke and lava on Isabela Island, May 25.

Reuters/Galapagos National Park/Diego Paredes

On Monday, Wolf volcano on the Galapagos Islands erupted spewing fire, smoke and lava.

Conolophus marthae, the Galapagos pink land iguana.

Conolophus marthae, the Galapagos pink land iguana.

Credit:

Gabriele Gentile/University of Rome

Authorities say the eruption, the first for the volcano in 33 years, posed no immediate danger to the local population of people.

Nor, apparently, to Isabela island's pink iguanas, the world's only known population of the the species. The Galapagos National Park says that the lava was flowing in an opposite direction from their habitat, raising hopes they will not be affected.

The Wolf volcano perched atop one of Ecuador's Galapagos Islands erupted in the early hours of Monday. The roughly 1.1-mile high Wolf volcano is located on Isabela Island, home to a rich variety of flora and fauna typical of the archipelago that helped in

The Wolf volcano perched atop one of Ecuador's Galapagos Islands erupted in the early hours of Monday. The roughly 1.1-mile high Wolf volcano is located on Isabela Island, home to a rich variety of flora and fauna typical of the archipelago that helped inspire Charles Darwin's theory of evolution following his 1835 visit.

Credit:

Reuters/Galapagos National Park/Diego Paredes

Wolf volcano on Isabela Island, May 25, 2015.

Wolf volcano on Isabela Island, May 25, 2015.

Credit:

Reuters/Galapagos National Park/Diego Paredes