Stephen Snyder

Senior Radio Producer

Stephen Snyder works in the Boston newsroom of PRI's The World. He manages a variety of tasks, but they all boil down to making news stories relevant and interesting to people.

Peabody Award-winning radio producer Stephen Snyder joined The World staff in 1998. Then the president was in the middle of impeachment and launched cruise missiles into Sudan to try to destroy Al Qaeda. India and Pakistan seemed to be on the brink of a nuclear war. The world economy was on a boom that seemed to be benefiting only the wealthy. 
Then, as now, Snyder's job was to help The World make the news beyond our borders understandable, interesting. Now, as then, he writes the daily 30-second radio ads that preview stories coming up on The World.  Sometimes he helps write and produce the stories themselves.
Snyder also helps public radio stations — maybe yours — to make The World a successful part of their broadcast day. He writes the short fundraising messages that you may hear anchor Marco Werman read on the air during public radio pledge drives. Several times a month he directs the radio program, and gets to drive our roller coaster of an hour through reports, interviews, host intros and musical bridges, all the while watching the clock to make sure we don't collide with a newscast or a station break.  
Before joining The World he was senior producer of public radio’s “Sound & Spirit."  From 1989-1995 he produced the Peabody Award-winning children’s news program “Kid Company” on WBZ in Boston. Before that he was a professional musician. He still makes music.

 
A family prepares tea outside the Directorate of Disaster office where they are camped, in Herat, Afghanistan, on Nov. 29, 2021. The United Nations is predicting that a record 274 million people — who together would amount to the world’s fourth most-popul

US Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking says the solution to the war in Yemen is diplomatic, not militaristic

The US envoy for the Yemen conflict, Tim Lenderking, tells host Carol Hills about his efforts to promote a political solution to the military conflict that is now in its seventh year, which has triggered what the UN has called the world's worst humanitarian crisis.

US Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking says the solution to the war in Yemen is diplomatic, not militaristic
Saudi jet fighters fly over Incirlik Air Base near Adana, southern Turkey, Friday, Feb. 26, 2016. 

US sales of missiles to Saudis signal business as usual — almost

US sales of missiles to Saudis signal business as usual — almost
Members of the South Korean Confederation of Trade Unions wearing masks and costumes inspired by the Netflix original Korean series "Squid Game" attend a rally demanding job security in Seoul, South Korea

Netflix hit ‘Squid Game’ exposes the growing resentment between rich and poor, psychiatrist says

Netflix hit ‘Squid Game’ exposes the growing resentment between rich and poor, psychiatrist says
Abdulrahman al-Sadhan poses with his sister Areej Al Sadhan

Sister of imprisoned Saudi aid worker: 'They are already calling me a terrorist'

Sister of imprisoned Saudi aid worker: 'They are already calling me a terrorist'
In this Aug. 22, 2021, image provided by the US Air Force and made through a night vision scope, a US Air Force security forces raven, assigned to the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron, maintains a cordon around a US Air Force C-17 Globemaster III in s

Taliban have acquired an 'overwhelming amount of potential weaponry,' global security expert says

Taliban have acquired an 'overwhelming amount of potential weaponry,' global security expert says
People wait outside a shop where face masks and vitamins are being given away in Mandalay, Myanmar

6.2 million Burmese could go hungry by October. It’s the worst situation in ‘living memory,’ UN official says.

Stephen Anderson, country director of the World Food Program, spoke with The World's Marco Werman about the dire situation, from Myanmar's capital city, Naypyidaw.

6.2 million Burmese could go hungry by October. It’s the worst situation in ‘living memory,’ UN official says.
A crowd of survivors are shown standing and sitting on a bridge with several damaged buildings in the distance.

The only known photos from Hiroshima taken on Aug. 6, 1945

Yoshito Matsushige took the only known photographs of Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945, after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city during World War II. Nearly half a century later, Matsushige told his story to Max McCoy, a reporter visiting Hiroshima from Kansas. McCoy speaks with The World's host Marco Werman about the photographer who captured the devastation on film that day.

The only known photos from Hiroshima taken on Aug. 6, 1945
Supporters of President Donald Trump, including Jacob Chansley, right with fur hat, are confronted by US Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber inside the Capitol in Washington. Many of those who stormed the Ca

Foreign powers amplified QAnon content to sow discord that led to Jan. 6 Capitol riots, extremism expert says

Mia Bloom, co-author of "Pastels and Pedophiles: Inside the Mind of QAnon," speaks with The World's host Marco Werman about the rise of QAnon, a US-based, conspiracy-fueled movement with international reach.

Foreign powers amplified QAnon content to sow discord that led to Jan. 6 Capitol riots, extremism expert says
"A Queen's Dream," illustration by Mayyu Khan, a Rohingya artist living in Kutupalong Refugee Camp, from "Rohingya Folk Tales," by Mohammed Rezuwan.

This young folklorist is on a mission to preserve Rohingya stories before it's too late

Mohammed Rezuwan, 24, lives in Cox’s Bazar, the world’s largest refugee camp. He’s gathering Rohingya folk stories before a generation of storytellers dies off.

This young folklorist is on a mission to preserve Rohingya stories before it's too late
A woman wearing a purple shirt is shown with her hands out stretched and shouting among a large crowd of people.

Protesters in Cuba are calling for the ‘end of the communist state,’ historian says

Lillian Guerra, who writes extensively on the politics of Cuba, has been following the protests from her home in Gainesville, Florida. She joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about the significance of protests over the weekend.

Protesters in Cuba are calling for the ‘end of the communist state,’ historian says
Harris at the podium in Guatemala on a diplomatic visit

Addressing migration requires long-term commitment, says analyst on Harris visit to Guatemala

About $13 billion are squandered as a result of corruption in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, says Adriana Beltran, an analyst with The Washington Office on Latin America.

Addressing migration requires long-term commitment, says analyst on Harris visit to Guatemala
The downtown skyline of San Francisco is shown in the distance with a couple walking in the nearground in shadown.

Anti-Asian hate crimes on the rise

The Asian American Pacific Islander community has a website where people can report hate crimes in more than 10 Asian languages. Russell Jeung, co-founder of StopAAPIHate.org, tells host Marco Werman about the increase of anti-Asian hate crimes in the US during the pandemic, and what steps his organization is taking to document them.

Anti-Asian hate crimes on the rise
Houthi fighters hold images of relatives killed in violent conflict

Yemen's most stable city threatened by Houthi takeover

Houthi militias have renewed their military campaign to take over Marib, Yemen. Nadwa al-Dawsari, a scholar at the Middle East Institute, tells The World what’s at stake with this new push to take control of Marib.

Yemen's most stable city threatened by Houthi takeover
Leo Hornak's Christmas Pudding

Recipe: Victorian Christmas pudding perfect for first-time cooks

Reporter Leo Hornak produced his first traditional holiday dessert filled with fruit, alcohol and centuries of British history. Britons love to serve up the dish — even if they don't actually like it.

Recipe: Victorian Christmas pudding perfect for first-time cooks
Sadaqa Hospital, as seen from the street

Film shows how Yemen's health workers struggle to save young victims of malnutrition

The youngest casualties of the civil war are not from fighting. Malnutrition kills some children and stunts the growth of others. A new film profiles the work of doctors and nurses who treat them.

Film shows how Yemen's health workers struggle to save young victims of malnutrition