finance

Zimbabwe Money

Running out of US dollars, Zimbabwe says it will print its own 'bond notes'

The announcement has sparked fears of a return to the hyperinflation that wrecked the economy several years ago.

Running out of US dollars, Zimbabwe says it will print its own 'bond notes'
A London bank worker counts out euro notes three weeks before they became legal tender across most of Europe, December 12, 2001.

Germany’s coming for all those euros stuffed in your mattress

Germany’s coming for all those euros stuffed in your mattress
A man stands next to an electronic board in Shanghai showing the benchmark stock indices for Shanghai and Shenzhen, after the new circuit breaker mechanism suspended Thursday’s stock trading on the market in Shanghai, China, on January 7, 2016.

China’s stock markets are plummeting, but that’s only part of the story

China’s stock markets are plummeting, but that’s only part of the story
People lined up outside of an ATM in Greece.

As leaders debate, these students in Greece can go to college for free

As leaders debate, these students in Greece can go to college for free
People line up to withdraw cash from an ATM in Greece

Who sees opportunity now in Greece? Oh, Bitcoin.

Who sees opportunity now in Greece? Oh, Bitcoin.
Behavioral economics can lead to some funny and slightly obvious epiphanies about human behavior. But, in the right hands, it can radically transform the way a company or government does business.

What behavioral economics tells us about human behavior

More people would turn in their taxes if the government went ahead and filled out the forms for them, research shows. Richard Thaler, a behavioral economist, explains the counterintuitive things he’s learned by studying our deeply irrational behavior.

What behavioral economics tells us about human behavior
Grafton Street is a principal shopping street in Dublin's city center.

Ireland looks to close a major tax loophole, but some Irish want to keep the money flowing

An improving economy and declining unemployment mean that Ireland is finding its footing again, and looking to close a controversial loophole that let huge corporations avoid taxes there. But some Irish people think all's fair in love and finance, and want the so-called 'Double Irish' to stay.

Ireland looks to close a major tax loophole, but some Irish want to keep the money flowing
A woman walks past a currency exchange store with an Argentine national flag on display in Buenos Aires' financial district on August 14, 2014

How a New York court got to dictate terms to a entire country

Argentina has South America's third-largest economy, but many of its financial decisions are now subject to the review of a New York court. That's because Argentina turned to American firms to borrow money, and the US legal system now gets to decide how its debts will be handled.

How a New York court got to dictate terms to a entire country
People walk past Islamic Bank of Britain's (IBB) first branch on Edgware Road in London.

London is becoming the newest hub of Islamic finance

Already one of the world’s major financial centers, London is now going after an even bigger piece of the pie — Islamic finance. The sector is growing by 30 percent a year, so British government officials are pushing for a public, high-profile campaign to establish the city as a hub.

London is becoming the newest hub of Islamic finance
Jerome Kerviel

A disgraced French trader walks home from his meeting with the pope — to Paris

Six years ago, derivatives trader Jerome Kerviel made some bad trades — very bad trades that cost his bank nearly $7 billion. Now he faces prison and perhaps paying it back. So he's decided to take a long walk, from Rome to Paris.

A disgraced French trader walks home from his meeting with the pope — to Paris