entertainment

The Growing Left, Australia's Refugees, Florida Death Row

February 3, 2017:

What Progressives Can Learn from Right Wing Organizing (8 min)  Capturing the Energy of the Left (7 min) Re-Examining the Death Penalty in Florida (6 min) Australia Asks America to Take Refugees (4 min) Films to Catch and Skip at the Box Office This Weekend (5 min) Turn It Up To Eleven With These Music Documentaries (4 min) Life According to 'Saved By the Bell' (16 min)
The Growing Left, Australia's Refugees, Florida Death Row

Machine Control, Citizen Scientists, Reality TV

May 18, 2016:

1. What Happens When The Machines Don't Need Us Anymore (10 min)

2. Wealth, Poverty, and The Clinton Welfare Legacy (6 min)

3. While Congress Debates Zika, Citizen Scientists Fight Mosquitoes (9 min)

4. When Transparency is Abused (5 min)

5. As Reality TV Dies Off, Execs Look Towards the Future (7 min)

Machine Control, Citizen Scientists, Reality TV

Viola Davis: Diversity in Hollywood 'Not Just a Hashtag'

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Actress Viola Davis grew up in Central Falls, Rhode Island by way of St. Matthews, South Carolina. She was born into a family with five siblings, and as a child, Davis says she often was just looking for a meal or a bar of soap. She has far exceeded those desires and achieved measures of success many of us couldn't even imagine.

Viola Davis is a star. She's won Tony Awards and has been nominated for an Oscar—twice. In 2015, she became the first African-American woman to win an Emmy for lead actress in a drama series for her role as Annalise Keating on ABC's "How to Get Away with Murder." You may remember that she made the most of her acceptance speech that year.

"The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity," Davis told the audience.

In life there are few universal truths, except this one: Just because everything is going right for you, doesn't mean it's going right for everyone else in the world. That fact has pushed Davis into charity work with the The Vaseline Healing Project, which provides skin care and medical supplies to people living on the frontlines of poverty and disaster.

“We all want to be successful—that's the goal in life—and then you reach it and there is a disillusionment that comes," Davis tells The Takeaway. "There's not one celebrity that I know who does not have that. I think people would be surprised by the lack of fulfillment that it brings you. Because I think the last step that we forget is significance, and that's something thats much greater. That is, when I pass, what do I want to leave behind?”

What Viola Davis has already left in her wake is a will to push the Hollywood and the country to see the value in providing opportunity to women and minorities. 

Viola Davis: Diversity in Hollywood 'Not Just a Hashtag'

Viola Davis, Planned Parenthood's Cecile Richards, VICE News

February 25, 2016: 1. Viola Davis: Diversity in Hollywood 'Not Just a Hashtag' | 2. Why America’s Money Men Won’t Fund Black Women | 3. Libya Struggles in The Fight Against ISIS | 4. Curing Blindness in the Developing World | 5. Planned Parenthood Chief Looks Ahead | 6. New Debate Model Could Actually Challenge Presidential Candidates

Viola Davis, Planned Parenthood's Cecile Richards, VICE News

Trump 2016: The Ultimate Reality TV Show?

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On Saturday, American voters filled in another piece of the 2016 puzzle. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won the Democratic Caucus in Nevada, and billionaire businessman Donald Trump secured victory in the Republican primary in South Carolina.

The two parties will crisscross this week. Democratic voters will head to the polls in South Carolina on Saturday, and Republicans will cast their ballots tomorrow in Nevada.

America can't take its eyes off Donald Trump. And even though we're all watching, his shifting answers and half truths never seem to catch up with him. That's the Donald Trump way—brushing off previous answers, and staying one step ahead of candidates by using his own standard of truthfulness.

Those are all skills he took time honing as a reality television star. Mark Singer, a staff writer for The New Yorker, first identified Trump as a performance artist in 1997. Eli Attie, a TV writer and producer known for shows like "The West Wing," was once chief speech writer for Vice President Al Gore.

Singer and Attie join The Takeaway to examine Trump 2016 through the lens of political entertainment.

What you'll learn from this segment:

Why Attie and Singer call Trump's campaign the ultimate reality TV show. How Trump has tailored his personality for entertainment and politics. How the political landscape overall has evolved to be more like entertainment.
Trump 2016: The Ultimate Reality TV Show?