Fariba Nawa

Fariba Nawa is an Istanbul-based journalist, speaker and author of "Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords and One Woman's Journey through Afghanistan."

Fariba Nawa is a journalist, speaker and author. She reports on various issues, including immigrant communities, human rights and the global drug trade. Her work has been published in numerous publications, including Women in the World/New York Times, Newsweek, The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, Daily Beast, Sunday Times Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle and Mother Jones. She's the author of Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords and One Woman's Journey through Afghanistan, a mix of memoir and reportage focused on women's roles in the world's biggest narcotics business. 

The funeral of Syrian anti-Assad activist Orouba Barakat, 62, and her daughter, American journalist Halla Barakat (pictured), 23. The pair were found stabbed to death in their apartment in Istanbul on Sept. 21, 2017.

An American journalist was murdered in Turkey. Why didn’t the US investigate?

Turkish authorities say Halla Barakat and Orouba Barakat were killed in a family dispute. Others suspect a targeted assassination.

An American journalist was murdered in Turkey. Why didn’t the US investigate?
Sevilay, a mother of two in Istanbul, got permission from her husband to have an abortion as required by law. But she had trouble finding a public hospital that would do it, and even some of her friends criticize her for her decision.

Abortion increasingly hard to access in Turkey

Abortion increasingly hard to access in Turkey
A woman wearing a hat stands on a subway platform

As ‘fed up’ women in Turkey leave marriages, domestic violence and divorce rates rise

As ‘fed up’ women in Turkey leave marriages, domestic violence and divorce rates rise
A young girl sits on a couch.

1 million Afghan children face an uncertain future in Iran

1 million Afghan children face an uncertain future in Iran
shawarma

Pro-opposition Syrians in Turkey grapple with losing the war

Pro-opposition Syrians in Turkey grapple with losing the war
US President Donald Trump meets with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey during the UN General Assembly in New York, Sept. 21, 2017.

Tit-for-tat visa bans leave Turks and Americans heartbroken

Relations between the US and Turkey are deteriorating. Now, the countries have enacted new visa restrictions against one another's citizens. Those affected most include students, business travelers, tourists and other nonimmigrant travelers.

Tit-for-tat visa bans leave Turks and Americans heartbroken
Turkish writer

Award-winning Turkish writer free to travel again

Multiple award-winning Turkish author Asli Erdogan is no longer trapped in her native Turkey.

Award-winning Turkish writer free to travel again
Searching

DNA might help him identify his family. But he can't find a way to give a sample.

It's been nearly two years since Mujtaba Haidar's family disappeared on a boat bound for Lesbos. He's still searching for them.

DNA might help him identify his family. But he can't find a way to give a sample.
Pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) and "Hayir" ("No") supporters attend a campaign for the upcoming referendum in Istanbul, Turkey, April 13, 2017.

Young Turkish activists prove it will be hard for Erdogan to shut down free expression

Turks will vote on a referendum Sunday that would expand the powers of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and could keep him in office until 2029. Opponents say it's a power grab by an increasingly authoritarian ruler — and they’re finding creative ways to stand up to a president who’s been widely accused of cracking down on free expression.

Young Turkish activists prove it will be hard for Erdogan to shut down free expression
Elif Koc, 18, shapes a customer's eyebrows at the Twins salon in Istanbul. Kroc is voting yes on Sunday's referendum. But she says the issue is dividing her family.

Is Turkey's referendum a vote for more efficient government, or a power grab?

Polls suggest the April 16 race is close and many are still undecided.

Is Turkey's referendum a vote for more efficient government, or a power grab?
Dozens of pro-immigration demonstrators cheer and hold signs as international passengers arrive at Dulles International Airport

These women, many Muslim, are leading the resistance against Trump's executive order

On Saturday and Sunday, thousands gathered at Dulles Airport in Virginia and in New York, Dallas, Chicago and elsewhere to protest the executive order. Muslim American women at Dulles — and their daughters — were at the forefront of a peaceful resistance movement.

These women, many Muslim, are leading the resistance against Trump's executive order
Two women discuss Turkish politics during a joint rally in Istanbul between the Islamist and secularist parties shortly after the attempted coup in late July.

Turkey's fraught history with headscarves

It used to be that women who wore headscarves in Turkey faced harassment and discrimination. Lately, it's the secular women bearing the brunt of it.

Turkey's fraught history with headscarves
Hoor, 16, arrived in Istanbul in late June

For one Afghan teenage girl, the refugee trail is as dangerous as the war left behind

A 16-year-old girl fled Afghanistan for safety in Turkey — but when she got there she was abused.

For one Afghan teenage girl, the refugee trail is as dangerous as the war left behind
Women activists, some dressed in wedding gowns representing child brides forced into marriage, hold placards that read "End violence" to protest rape and domestic violence, in Ankara, Turkey. November, 2011.

Syrian influx in Turkey prompts upsurge in polygamy

Polygamy was outlawed in Turkey 90 years ago, but the practice has been gaining in some areas, fueled by the influx of Syrian refugees. Activists say the government is not doing anything about it.

Syrian influx in Turkey prompts upsurge in polygamy
Afghan refugees Iran

Iran is recruiting thousands of Afghan refugees to join the Syrian regime's war

In exchange, the Iranian government promises cash and legal status to undocumented Afghans. Rights groups says the refugees are forced into signing up.

Iran is recruiting thousands of Afghan refugees to join the Syrian regime's war