Durrie Bouscaren

Reporter

Durrie Bouscaren is an Istanbul-based reporter for The World. She covers migration, politics and social change in Turkey, Iran and the Middle East. Before moving to Turkey, Bouscaren covered local news for St. Louis Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio. She was the 2018 John Alexander Fellow for NPR, where she spent two months in Papua New Guinea investigating gender based violence. When not reporting, she can be found riding her bike along Istanbul’s old city walls, or figuring out how to grow grapes on her roof.

collapsed building

Parents seek justice for children crushed in collapsed hotel during Turkish earthquake

In the year following catastrophic earthquakes in Turkey, the quest for accountability has been elusive. But a group of parents whose children died in a hotel collapse have brought a landmark criminal case to court.

Parents seek justice for children crushed in collapsed hotel during Turkish earthquake
shepherd with sheep amid rubble

A year on, a Kurdish village near Turkey’s earthquake epicenter says it's been overlooked

A year on, a Kurdish village near Turkey’s earthquake epicenter says it's been overlooked
Turkish breakfasts are elaborate and offer a wide variety of options eaten over the course of an hour or two. Diners are not expected to eat everything on the table. 

In Istanbul, the classic ‘Turkish breakfast’ comes under fire for food waste

In Istanbul, the classic ‘Turkish breakfast’ comes under fire for food waste
Antakya’s Uzun Çarşı, a historic covered bazaar, was partially destroyed during the Feb. 6 earthquakes. Workers have cleared much of the debris from walkways and shopkeepers have reopened, sometimes directly across from piles of rubble.

In Turkey’s hardest-hit province, earthquake survivors adapt to a life without buildings

In Turkey’s hardest-hit province, earthquake survivors adapt to a life without buildings
building that was destroyed

Life returns to Antakya, a city nearly leveled by earthquakes in southern Turkey

Life returns to Antakya, a city nearly leveled by earthquakes in southern Turkey
Men remove debris as they search for people in a destroyed building in Adana, Turkey, Feb. 6, 2023.

After deadly quake in Turkey, rescue teams struggle to help amid frigid temps

The death toll has surpassed 5,000, with thousands of others injured after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck large parts of southeastern Turkey and northern Syria on Monday. Rescue teams are trying to find people buried under the rubble of collapsed buildings.

After deadly quake in Turkey, rescue teams struggle to help amid frigid temps
Syrian children who are refugees in Turkey face many barriers to learning.

In Turkey, refugee children face hurdles to school enrollment

Many Syrian families in Turkey face school enrollment challenges due to a Turkish law that says no more than 30% of schoolchildren in a single class can be foreigners. Families in border cities like Gaziantep say their children are being turned away with few alternatives.

In Turkey, refugee children face hurdles to school enrollment
cat on a chair

Desperate pet owners turn to illegal drug markets to cure a rare cat virus 

If a cat contracts feline infectious peritonitis, a chronic wasting disease, it is almost always fatal. A pharmaceutical company, however, developed a recipe for a cure. Global drug manufacturers are now marketing off-label versions of the medication — and cat owners say it works. 

Desperate pet owners turn to illegal drug markets to cure a rare cat virus 
A view of Almaty from Kok Tobe Park, a popular hilltop tourist attraction accessible by cable car.

Stuck without passports in Kazakhstan, Russians who avoided the draft face a ticking clock

As hundreds of thousands of young men streamed into Central Asia to avoid the draft in Russia at the end of September, activists realized that many of the new arrivals were now jobless, homeless — and without legal papers.

Stuck without passports in Kazakhstan, Russians who avoided the draft face a ticking clock
Multicolored displays of Korean marinated salads are a mainstay at Almaty’s Green Bazaar.

In Kazakhstan, timeless Korean recipes are loved and maintained

In Almaty's Green Bazaar, vendors sell a variety of foods that represent the culinary heritage of hundreds of thousands of Koreans who call Kazakhstan home.

In Kazakhstan, timeless Korean recipes are loved and maintained
Wind catchers in Yazd, Iran are an ancient form of natural air conditioning.

Long before electricity, wind catchers of Persia kept residents cool. Climate-conscious architects are taking notes.

This 12th-century invention was a reliable form of air-conditioning in Iran for centuries. And as temperatures continue to rise around the world, this ancient way of staying cool has gained renewed attention for its emissions-free and cost-effective design.

Long before electricity, wind catchers of Persia kept residents cool. Climate-conscious architects are taking notes.
neighborhood sidewalk

'How long will this continue?': People in Istanbul see their rents double as inflation soars

This summer, Turkish inflation reached levels not seen since the 1990s, and nowhere is it more clear than the rental market. Tenants are seeing their rents double, or even triple, in just one year.

'How long will this continue?': People in Istanbul see their rents double as inflation soars
Syrians sit at a coffee shop

'I'm being strangled here': Refugees returned by Turkey to Syria say conditions are bleak

In the Turkish city of Istanbul, police have continued a stepped-up campaign of random ID checks in immigrant neighborhoods. This week, officials acknowledged that 19,000 people have been deported over the past eight months. It’s not clear how many of them are Syrians.

'I'm being strangled here': Refugees returned by Turkey to Syria say conditions are bleak
Views from the Cedars of God, a 25-acre forest preserve just six miles from the monastery. Situated in the Kadisha Valley, the site represents one of the last remaining pieces of old growth cedar forest in the country. Some of the trees are believed to be

These monks are on a mission to protect Lebanon's sacred cedar trees — before it's too late

Lebanon’s old-growth cedar forests have been decimated by centuries of logging. Now, rising temperatures from climate change are set to take the rest.

These monks are on a mission to protect Lebanon's sacred cedar trees — before it's too late
view of the city

Solar power is the 'only business that's booming' amid financial and electricity crises in Lebanon, experts say

As people faced with electricity blackouts install solar panels on their rooftops, they say they're seeing some relief — but it comes alongside frustration with the government's inability to power the country.

Solar power is the 'only business that's booming' amid financial and electricity crises in Lebanon, experts say