Iraq

On Memorial Day: Stories of Trauma, Survival and Renewal

This Memorial Day, The Takeaway brings you five stories that deal with trauma, survival, psychedelics, music and convalescence. The memories of three mass-shooting survivors exemplify the somber legacy of surviving an American tragedy and demonstrate how it reorients your worldview; When the brain survives a traumatic experience the toll taken has traditionally been seen as an emotional scar, but new research is helping to overturn this narrative; outside the more mainstream therapies for PTSD, there's another class of drugs currently being tested: psychedelics; soldiers returning from Iraq faced insurmountable obstacles as they reintroduced themselves to society. Some injuries, such as burns and amputations, bore palpable signs, alerting the public to the pains rendered in the line of duty. Others scars were borne invisibly; and Singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier tries to illustrate the experience of returning to civilian life in her new album, "Rifles and Rosary Beads."

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On Memorial Day: Stories of Trauma, Survival and Renewal

Wealth In America: What Is It? And Who's Got It?

Millions of college students are heading to the stage this month to collect their diploma, or to move from community college to a full time university. But for many, that transition comes with a significant financial burden. The Takeaway examines the impact debt and other financial obligations have on a person's ability to accumulate wealth. Plus, we cover the unfolding protests in Gaza as the U.S. inaugurates its embassy in Jerusalem; and the parliamentary elections in Iraq that may catapult to victory a cleric who twice led uprisings against U.S. forces in the country.

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebook, or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

Wealth In America: What Is It? And Who's Got It?

Angry Town Hall Meetings, Sex Offender Rights, Seeking Out the KKK

February 21, 2017:

1. Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster Tapped For National Security Adviser (7 min)

2. Iraqi Forces Lead Offensive to Retake Western Mosul (5 min)

3. Reps Feel Public Outrage at Town Hall Meetings (6 min)

4. Black Artist Tries to Bridge Racial Divides With KKK Members (8 min)

5. SCOTUS to Decide: Can a Facebook Post Be Illegal? (7 min)

6. Citizens Take a Stand in Broadband Access Debate (4 min)

7. SCOTUS to Decide: Can a Facebook Post Be Illegal? (7 min)

Angry Town Hall Meetings, Sex Offender Rights, Seeking Out the KKK

Dissecting the Chilcot Report, Texting 911, and the Modern Protest Music

On today's show:

Veterans and their family members have branded the delay of the Chilcot Report “morally reprehensible.” Kristofer Goldsmith, who served as a sergeant with the Army's third infantry division from 2004-07, says a civilian inquiry would be an appropriate thing for the U.S. to do. Police in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, were captured by cell phone footage shooting Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man who was selling CDs outside a convenience store. The Department of Justice will be investigating the shooting, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards announced on Wednesday. Meanwhile, protests have grown outside the convenience store where Sterling was shot. Maya Lau, reporter for the Advocate, discusses the incident and the aftermath.   The World Health Organization has launched an emergency yellow fever vaccination campaign in Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo after an outbreak of the disease has sickened thousands killed upwards of 400 so far this year. Dr. William Ross, a professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the head of epidemiology at the International Vaccine Access Center, tells us about the challenges of vaccinating these communities. Should 911 calls be made via text? During the Orlando shooting, some people who were held hostage in the club were afraid that calling 911 would draw the attention of the attacker, but Orlando does not have 911 texting. Only one-tenth of the nation's 6,000 911 dispatch centers can accept text messages, while another 150 are upgrading this year to accept texts. Joseph Giacalone, a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a retired New York City police sargent, discusses the benefits and the downfalls of 911 texting. Rikers Island holds 10,000 inmates, and around 800 of them are 21 years old and younger. In 2013, Literacy for Incarcerated Teens came to the prison complex. It was through this program that Robert Galinsky, who now leads LIT's personal development programs, met Marla Riera, who was incarcerated at Rikers Island for 8 months. Protest music has come a long way since the days of Woody Guthrie. Kraig R. Moss is a country singer and a Trump supporter, and he says "music has changed the world.
Dissecting the Chilcot Report, Texting 911, and the Modern Protest Music

The Human Toll of the Baghdad Bombing, Reaching Jupiter's Orbit, and Inter-partisan Marriages

Today on The Takeaway:

Abel al-Jaf has been identified as one of 165 dead in the ISIS bombing in Baghdad on July 3rd. Jonathan Hollander, President and Artistic Director, Battery Dance Company and Dancing to Connect, knew Adel well. He shares his memories of al-Jaf, how they became communicating--and the importance of the connection outside of Iraq.

There were 44 people killed at the Ataturk Airport in Istanbul last week, followed by a brutal attack in a restaurant in Bangladesh. Rukmini Callimachi, foreign correspondent for our partner The New York Times is here to set the three attacks into context.

It's taken Juno 5 years to get to Jupiter. What will it discover? Jason Kendall, adjunct professor of astronomy at William Patterson University, tells us some of the things they are expecting to find.

FBI director James Comey announced Tuesday that while Hillary Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information, they are recommending no charges be filed. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what this means.

Thanks to the pioneering work of scientists, computers and other devices have become increasingly clever about reading and understanding human emotions. In the future, the information that our digital devices will be able to glean about our inner selves will no doubt be valuable to many, but could it also make us vulnerable because of privacy concerns? Rana el Kaliouby, a pioneer in the emerging world of emotional technology and the co-founder and CEO of the emotional recognition company, Affectiva, tells us that Affectiva has collected over 4 million videos of faces from 75 countries around the world.

Our everyday rituals are the results of thousand of years of human behavior, but it's harder to study them than you'd think. Greg Jenner, historian and author of "A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Everyday Life from the Stone Age to the Phone Age," talks about the quirky connetions between hair care and tooth care and warfare and manners.

The Human Toll of the Baghdad Bombing, Reaching Jupiter's Orbit, and Inter-partisan Marriages