Zika virus

Close-up of a mosquito Aedes aegypti feeding on blood

Zika is no longer a public health emergency, WHO says

Still, the virus remains "a highly significant and long term problem," according to the world health body.

Zika is no longer a public health emergency, WHO says
Three-month-old Jesus, photographed on Oct. 5 in Guarenas, Venezuela, was born with microcephaly

Zika’s million-dollar question: Where are the birth defects?

Zika’s million-dollar question: Where are the birth defects?
Balance beam practice

How worried should Olympic visitors be about Zika?

How worried should Olympic visitors be about Zika?

Brazil now has doubts that Zika alone causes birth defects

Brazil now has doubts that Zika alone causes birth defects
Health centers in New York are providing information about the Zika virus to New Yorkers traveling home to the Dominican Republic. People who've traveled to the DR represent more than half of the Zika cases in New York.

Dominicans in New York are planning summer visits home. That means Zika planning.

Dominicans in New York are planning summer visits home. That means Zika planning.
Electron microscopy of Zika virus (orange) bound to cell membrane (brown) in neurosphere generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Photo by Credit: Rodrigo Madeiro

How much do we really know about the Zika virus?

Do we know enough about Zika to begin giving out public health advice about pregnancy?

How much do we really know about the Zika virus?
Looking at male mosquitos in Tetiaroa.

What you need to know about the Zika virus

Should you travel to Latin America with the Zika virus raging? Should you buy mosquito netting now. Science writer Karen Weintraub answers frequently asked questions.

What you need to know about the Zika virus
A priest holds up a banner reading "Brazil alive! Without abortion" while standing near an altar where Pope Francis later celebrated mass.

Thanks to Zika, now we know Latin America has the toughest abortion policies in the world

There are only six countries in the world that ban abortion under any circumstances. Four of them are in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Thanks to Zika, now we know Latin America has the toughest abortion policies in the world
doctors at Ipojuca

A 'tsunami of disease' slams Brazil's health system

The triple-whammy of mosquito-borne illnesses — the Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya — has pushed Brazil’s universal healthcare system beyond its already stretched capacity at a time when there is little money to shore it up. In the state of Pernambuco, the scope of the epidemics is stunning: Reported mosquito-borne illnesses rose from 20,000 in 2014 to 150,000 in 2015.

A 'tsunami of disease' slams Brazil's health system
Nadja Cristina Gomes Bezerra

Brazil's microcephaly outbreak captured in portraits

Last week, Across Women's Lives photographer Anne Bailey spent time at a rehabilitation clinic in Recife, Brazil, for babies with microcephaly. She took portraits of a few of them with their parents.

Brazil's microcephaly outbreak captured in portraits
Germana Soares is shown holding her child next to a doctor holding a black and white striped card.

'We have a child with microcephaly, and we're happy'

Germana Soares' three-month-old son Guilherme has microcephaly. But she's determined to give him a normal life.

'We have a child with microcephaly, and we're happy'
Elaine Marques, 29 (center left) smiles at Germana Soares, 24, at a group birthday party for babies born with microcephaly in Recife, Brazil.

How Brazil's favorite app is helping doctors and parents cope with microcephaly

Parents of children with microcephaly in Brazil are now finding each other via the social media platform WhatsApp. Brazilians doctors and scientists also credit the platform for helping them quickly understand the scope of the burgeoning epidemic of birth defects.

How Brazil's favorite app is helping doctors and parents cope with microcephaly
Margareth Capurro

These mosquitoes could be a weapon against Zika

The mosquito that carries the Zika virus also carries dengue and other deadly diseases. So research into how to kill or alter the mosquito population is crucial in Brazil.

These mosquitoes could be a weapon against Zika
UM's Mario Stevenson (left) examines a new Zika virus detection test at his team's Miami lab.

The race is on to come up with a good test for Zika

President Barack Obama is getting out in front of the fight against the Zika. He's asked Congress for emergency funding to combat the mosquito-borne virus. The money could speed the development of a vaccine, and a much needed diagnostic test for Zika.

The race is on to come up with a good test for Zika
A woman and child in costume dance during a street carnival at which health workers distributed kits with information about the Zika virus, on Ipanema beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

As Brazil marks Carnival, women worry about Zika

With no end to the outbreak in sight, Zika has become a part of the five-day celebrations. Mosquito costumes have featured heavily in parades across the country. Health officials handed out paper fans with information about how to avoid the virus. And some pregnant women did what was once unthinkable in a nation known for its celebratory spirit — they stayed home.

As Brazil marks Carnival, women worry about Zika