Japanese Americans

Jim

Japanese Americans remember a dark chapter when they were 'more number than name'

Looking back to the US incarceration of Japanese Americans and how, as one historian puts it, people can "lose sight of our important national values of justice and rule of law."

Japanese Americans remember a dark chapter when they were 'more number than name'
Newspaper clippings in scrapbook about the attack on Pearl Harbor

At Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were victims of the attack — and their own government

At Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were victims of the attack — and their own government
People line up in front of a bulding

Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II could still vote, kind of

Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II could still vote, kind of
A group of workers pose in a farm, wearing their work clothes. Top row standing, bottom row sitting. Black and white photo.

How Japanese and Mexican American farm workers formed an alliance that made history

How Japanese and Mexican American farm workers formed an alliance that made history
Two kimonos in the wind on a laundry line

These images of Japanese American incarceration were embargoed for almost 30 years

These images of Japanese American incarceration were embargoed for almost 30 years
Bruce Kaji, shaking the hand of Japan's Crown Prince who had just landed in Los Angeles on a US Air Force airplane, in 1961. "In our family, we call this photo, The Prince and the Pauper.," says Bruce's son, Jon.

Toyota built Torrance into the second-largest home of Japanese Americans. Now, it's leaving

It may seem hard to believe, but Toyota almost didn't make it in the US. Its first car, the Toyopet Crown, was a flop. Toyota helped establish a huge Japanese-American community in Torrance, California that finds it hard to imagine the company is moving on.

Toyota built Torrance into the second-largest home of Japanese Americans. Now, it's leaving