Mitt Romney offers $1.6 million for Newt Gingrich’s contact with Freddie Mac

GlobalPost

Mitt Romney is offering a $1.6 million reward for the person who can present Newt Gingrich’s contract with Freddie Mac, according to his campaign website.

The press release, titled: "MISSING: NEWT’S FREDDIE MAC PAPERS — $1.6 MILLION REWARD is signed by Gail Gitcho, Romney Communications Director, and reads:

"Newt Gingrich’s Freddie Mac contract raises more questions than answers. His secrecy about his lobbying for Freddie Mac is troubling. No amount of bluster will hide the fact that Newt had his hand in Freddie Mac to the tune of $25,000 a month. The bursting housing bubble helped lead to the current economic crisis and Newt Gingrich has his fingerprints all over it. His shifting explanations amount to a shell game with the truth. Speaker Gingrich needs to fully disclose his work as a lobbyist for Freddie Mac."

Romney has accused Gingrich of lobbying for the federal mortgage firm, but Gingrich insists he was hired to help as a historian.

The press release quotes a Bloomberg report from Tuesday that Gingrich’s consulting firm released a copy of its 2006 contract with Freddie Mac, but that it "covers just one year of his multiple years of service and documents only $300,000 of the $1.6 million he received from the mortgage company."

According to The New York Times, the contract mentions monthly invoices that provide "more detailed records" of what Gingrich did for Freddie Mac, but that Gingrich had not released them.

According to Bloomberg, Gingrich's first contract wasn’t released because officials at the Center for Health Transformation coudn't find it, said Susan Meyers, a center spokeswoman who also works for the Gingrich campaign.

Romney, meantime, has called on Gingrich to return money he received from Freddie Mac and make his lobbying history public.

(More from GlobalPost: Mitt Romney's tax returns reveal he pays 15 percent, less than average American )

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