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The Takeaway

Border Crossings Swell as Resources for Migrants Diminish

Border Crossings Swell as Resources for Migrants Diminish

U.S. Customs and Border Protection released new data on migrant crossings at the border, revealing a system overwhelmed by more unauthorized crossings than seen in over a decade.

How Natural Disasters and Recovery Efforts Discriminate Against the Poor

The Alabama tornadoes blew through a low-income communities and left many mobile homes mangled. 

EXCLUSIVE: New Jersey ICE Detainee Details Transfer, Force-Feeding During Hunger Strike

A man detained by ICE in New Jersey told WNYC’s Matt Katz that in 2018, while on a hunger strike, ICE transferred him from New Jersey to El Paso, where he was force-fed.

Director Sebastián Lelio on Remaking His Own Film and the Limits of Representation

“Gloria Bell,” a new movie starring Julianne Moore, opens this Friday. It’s an English-language remake of the 2013 Chilean film, “Gloria,” but both are made by director Sebastián Lelio.

Guests:

Sheri Fink

Dr. Carlos Gutierrez

Pat Duggins

Matt Katz

Ranjana Natarajan

Sebastián Lelio

The Takeaway

Puerto Ricans Pay the Price for Debt Crisis

Puerto Rico is facing the biggest local government bankruptcy ever filed in the United States. The territory is currently 72 billion dollars in debt. Public employees are currently owed more than 50 billion dollars in pensions. And it’s Puerto Rican residents who are feeling the impacts of the debt crisis. We look at how the government is preparing to restructure its financial obligations. Plus, a conversation with the mayor of Miami about building a resilient city; a look at the newly-created school safety commission that won’t discuss the role of guns in school safety; a review of what it means to be a female rocker in a male-dominated field; and a discussion about Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood in light of a new documentary about his life.

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebook, or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

The Takeaway

“These are animals”: The Risks of Dehumanizing Language

In a roundtable discussion with local California politicians and law enforcement officials opposed to the state’s sanctuary city policies, President Trump referred to some immigrants as “animals.” It was not immediately clear who the president was characterizing with these remarks. After the incident, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders clarified that the president had been, all along, referring only to the criminal gang MS-13. The Takeaway looks at these remarks in the broader context of dehumanizing language being used by politicians to marginalized communities. Plus, we look at allegations that now-defunct political research firm Cambridge Analytica tried to suppress the African-American vote; the financial barriers to running for public office; the upcoming royal wedding which will welcome the first acknowledged mixed-race royal into the family; the latest movies to catch (or skip) at the box office this weekend; and a new T.V. show on Starz that features unflinching portrayals of Latinx culture and queer intimacy.

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebook, or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

The Takeaway

Why Are Police Called on People of Color Who Haven’t Committed a Crime?

This week, the public witnessed yet another incident of a white person calling the police on a person of color when no crime had been committed. A white Yale student called 911 on a fellow student, who was taking a nap in the campus lounge. It’s just the latest in a string of similar incidents where the police have been called for discriminatory reasons, or for no reason at all. The Takeaway looks into who is calling the police on people of color and why they’re doing so. Plus, we examine the conflicting impulses that drive what it means to be both Native and American; and we review the films you should catch (or skip) at the box office this weekend.

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebook, or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

The Takeaway

How N.R.A. Fundraising Shapes the Political Landscape

The National Rifle Association’s annual conference beings today in Dallas. Around 80,000 people are expected to attend and the event is slated to feature high-profile speakers such as Texas Senator Ted Cruz, social media personalities ‘Diamond and Silk,’ Vice President Mike Pence, and President Donald Trump. The renown of their speakership illustrates the massive influence the N.R.A. enjoys in politics, which in turn comes partly from organization’s longstanding success in fundraising. The Takeaway examines the N.R.A.’s outsize role in American political fundraising. Plus, we look at the fallout from a school bus drivers’ “sickout” in Atlanta; the launch of NASA’s first-ever probe exploring the Martian interior; former Boston Celtics player-coach Bill Russell making history 50 years ago this week; a brewing diplomatic controversy between England and Ethiopia over stolen artifacts; and a preview of this week’s must-see (and must-avoid) films.

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebook, or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

The Takeaway

Korean Leaders Pledge Denuclearization and End to Korean War

April 27, 2018: For the first time in over half a century, a North Korean leader crossed the country’s southern border today. Kim Jong-un met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the newly renovated “Peace House” as part of the two countries’ third summit. The Korean leaders discussed the path for an official end to the Korean War and North Korea’s nuclear program, pledging to totally denuclearize the Peninsula. The historic occasion was watched feverishly by media worldwide, and South Korean citizens took off from work to behold with rapt attention the breakthrough that might have seemed elusive when President Trump began to ramp up the threats on their northern neighbor. The Takeaway examines the prospect of longterm peace in light of this recent breakthrough. Plus, we examine a guilty verdict in the trial of comedian Bill Cosby; a self-described ex-‘incel’ speaks about his former community’s hateful posture; and a new enacted anti-trafficking bill that may endanger sex workers.

The Takeaway

19 Years Later, Columbine Looms Large Over Today’s Mass Shootings

April 20, 2018: It’s been 19 years since the massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, but just 65 days since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Today, as students across the country are once again walking out of their classrooms in protest, demanding “Never Again,” we hear from people who have survived mass shootings and been forced to consider what comes next. The Takeaway hosts a conversation between Columbine survivors and survivors of the Aurora massacre. Plus, we examine the unfolding teachers’ strike in Arizona; a new film by Amy Schumer that’s stirring some controversy; and after seven seasons, the very end of ABC’s smash-hit, “Scandal.”

The Takeaway

Striking Differences in Opioid Crisis Depending on State of Residence

April 13, 2018: Depending on where you live in the United States, the opioid crisis may look remarkably different, which is important when it comes to how local officials are confronting the epidemic. In Oregon, for example, opioid-assisted overdoses have dropped 20% from their peak a few years back, and there are some positive signs of recovery. But in Ohio, things are not at promising. The state is second only to West Virginia in its drug overdoses, and in many places morgues are running out of room for bodies of those who have died from an overdose. The Takeaway brings you to three regions across the country to survey how various communities are grappling with the opioid crisis. Plus, we check in on Virginia’s special legislative session designed to resolve lawmakers’ unwillingness to expand Medicaid; and we review the latest box office hits and duds with Rafer Guzman.

The Takeaway

Reflecting on a Year of Trump

Jan. 19, 2018: Hours after Donald Trump was sworn in, we traveled to Oklahoma to talk with one family of Republicans who were divided in their support for the president. We revisit them a year later, plus a look at how a government shutdown could affect the military; reviews of the new films hitting the box office; a rare interview with Queen Elizabeth II; and a look at what happens to women when abortion is illegal. 

The Takeaway

The Search for U.F.O.s

Dec. 22, 2017: A recent article in The New York Times reveals the Pentagon’s mysterious U.F.O. program. A physicist discusses this government initiative, and where else we should be looking. Plus, a look at the future of the Children’s Health Insurance Program; America’s first dark sky reserve; reviews of the new films hitting the box office this weekend; and part II of Aaron Glasscock’s story.