slavery

Making Reparations Work in America

Making Reparations Work in America

2020 candidates are speaking up about reparations. But this debate goes far beyond being a political talking point.

Congressional Failure to Approve Puerto Rico Recovery Aid Reflects Long History of Bipartisan Neglect

Puerto Rico's government recently had to cut food stamp benefits, adding further insecurity to an already vulnerable population.

McConnell Moves To Limit Debates Over Judges To Two Hours

Mitch McConnell’s latest push to fill the courts with young conservative judges involves a rule change that would limit floor debate over nominations to two hours total.

Lori Lightfoot Voted in as Chicago's First African American Woman Mayor

On Tuesday, Chicago became the largest U.S. city to elect an African American woman as mayor. Now, all eyes are on how Lori Lightfoot will address issues from gun violence to policing.

Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown's Mother, Loses Ferguson City Council Race

The election of Fran Griffin means that the city council now has an even split between black and white representatives for a majority black city that’s rife with racial tension.

Guests:

Maxine Crump

Katherine Franke

Nkechi Taifa

Dánica Coto

Andrea González-Ramírez

Lawrence Hurley

Making Reparations Work in America

Alabama Memorial Confronts America's Legacy of Lynching

April 26, 2018: The National Memorial For Peace And Justice opens in Montgomery, Alabama today. The monument, conceived by the Equal Justice Initiative, intends to memorialize the more than 4,000 known victims of lynching in this country. The project's precursor was a body of research collected by the E.J.I. which uncovered thousands of instances of lynchings that had not previously been documented. The research culminated in a 2015 report entitled "Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror," which unearthed incidents of hangings and other brutal measures of "racial terror" in twelve different states. The Takeaway explores America's first memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching. Plus, we look at the latest series of teachers' strikes in Alabama and Colorado; after 40 years, a potential suspect in the case of the Golden State Killer; and an exploration of the misogynist ideology called 'incel' culture that may have played a role in the Toronto van attack.

Alabama Memorial Confronts America's Legacy of Lynching

Reckoning with America's original sin.

June 19, 2017: On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas to announce the Emancipation Proclamation, which ended slavery and the Civil War. More than 150 years later, communities across the U.S. remember the day as Juneteenth. Isabel Wilkerson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Warmth of Other Suns," explains why she believes Juneteenth should be recognized as a national holiday. Plus, a look at terror and tension in the United Kingdom, history's most expensive congressional race, gun rights and race in America, and a queer cabaret show that blends humor, politics, and history.

Reckoning with America's original sin.

American Icons: Monticello

The home of America’s aspirations and deepest contradictions.

American Icons: Monticello