This combo of images released by NASA shows a side-by-side comparison of observations of the Southern Ring Nebula in near-infrared light, at left, and mid-infrared light, at right, from the Webb Telescope

New images from NASA telescope give a never-before-seen look into the cosmos

The newly released images from the James Webb Space Telescope show dancing galaxies and the death of a shooting star.

Associated Press

This combo of images released by NASA shows a side-by-side comparison of observations of the Southern Ring Nebula in near-infrared light, at left, and mid-infrared light, at right, from the Webb Telescope, July 12, 2022.

NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI via AP

NASA has unveiled a new set of images from the powerful James Webb Space Telescope.

The first image from the $10 billion telescope was released at the White House on Monday — a jumble of distant galaxies that went deeper into the cosmos than humanity has ever seen.

This image shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope

This image shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope, July 11, 2022.

Credit:

NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI via AP

Four additional photos released on Tuesday included more cosmic beauty shots. The images were released at NASA’s Goddard Space Center, complete with cheerleaders using pompoms the color of the telescope’s golden mirrors.

This image shows Stephan's Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies captured by the Webb Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI)

This image shows Stephan's Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies captured by the Webb Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), July 12, 2022. This mosaic was constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files, according to NASA. 

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NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI via AP

All but one of the images show parts of the universe seen by other telescopes. The Webb telescop's power, distant location from Earth and use of an infrared light spectrum showed them in new light.

“Every image is a new discovery and each will give humanity a view of the humanity that we’ve never seen before,’’ NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said Tuesday, rhapsodizing over images showing “the formation of stars, devouring black holes.”

This image shows the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula

This image shows the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula, July 12, 2022. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth, according to NASA. 

Credit:

NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI via AP

“We’ve really changed the understanding of our universe,” said European Space Agency director general Josef Aschbacher.

The European and Canadian space agencies joined NASA in building the powerful telescope.

This image shows Stephan's Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies captured by the Webb Telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI)

This image shows Stephan's Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies captured by the Webb Telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), July 12, 2022.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI via AP

The telescope took off last December from French Guiana in South America, and reached its lookout point 1 million miles from Earth in January.

Webb is considered the successor to the highly successful, but aging Hubble Space Telescope.

By Associated Press science writer Seth Borenstein.

Click above to listen to a discussion between The World's host Marco Werman and astronomer and author Dr. David Whitehouse about the images.