Top US oil executives to testify before Congress

The World
The logo for ExxonMobil appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange

The logo for ExxonMobil appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, April 23, 2018.

Richard Drew/AP/File photo

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United States
Top oil executives are testifying before Congress on Thursday in a landmark hearing before the US House Oversight Committee. Democratic legislators say they’re investigating a decadeslong, industrywide campaign to spread disinformation about the role of fossil fuels in causing global warming. Officials from Exxon Mobil Corp., Chevron, BP America and Shell will speak before the committee, along with leaders of the industry’s top lobbying group and the US Chamber of Commerce. They’re also expected to renew their commitment to fighting climate change. Rep. Ro Khanna, who is behind the hearing, is a leading critic of the industry. The companies have dodged previous requests to testify on these issues.

Sudan
The African Union has suspended Sudan over this week’s military coup. The group said in a communique that the decision would remain in place until “the effective restoration” of the transitional authority that was leading the country toward democratic elections, which the military overthrew. The World Bank also halted its disbursements to Sudan on Wednesday. Meanwhile, Sudan’s top military official, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, fired at least six ambassadors including the envoys to the United States, the European Union, Qatar, China and France, after some of them condemned the coup. Burhan also fired Adlan Ibrahim, head of the country’s Civil Aviation Authority, after the resumption of flights in and out of Khartoum’s international airport on Wednesday.

Myanmar
A new report has revealed that Myanmar’s junta tortures detainees in a systematic way. The Associated Press conducted interviews with 28 people imprisoned and released in recent months, and concluded that since its takeover of the government in February, Myanmar’s military has been torturing detainees in a methodical and systemic way across the country. The investigation based its findings on photographic evidence, sketches, and letters along with testimony from two military captains and an aide to a high-ranking commander; it's the most comprehensive look since the takeover. The country’s secretive detention system has held more than 9,000 people. Some of them had been detained for protesting against the military, while others were not given clear reasons for their arrests. Since February, security forces have killed more than 1,200 people, including an estimated 131 or more who were tortured to death.

From The World

Haiti’s rival gangs hold a firm grip on fuel supply, testing life at every level

A man balances his motorbike tank on his head as he waits outside a gas station in hopes of filling his tank, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 23, 2021. The ongoing fuel shortage has worsened, with demonstrators blocking roads and burning tires in Haiti'

A man balances his motorbike tank on his head as he waits outside a gas station in hopes of filling his tank, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 23, 2021. The ongoing fuel shortage has worsened, with demonstrators blocking roads and burning tires in Haiti's capital to decry the severe shortage and a spike in insecurity.

Credit:

Matias Delacroix/AP

Haiti is running out of gas — which is being called “liquid gold.”
And the capital has been brought to the brink of exhaustion due to fuel shortages.

Gangs, a powerful force in Haiti, are blockading fuel supplies at the ports, which are located in areas they control, driving residents of Port-au-Prince to a desperate search for gasoline and diesel. The World's Monica Campbell reports from the capital.

A new law in France aims to protect indie bookshops against outsized Amazon competition

Sylvia Whitman, proprietor of the English and American literature Shakespeare and Co. bookstore, checks her messages on her phone in Paris, France, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020.

Sylvia Whitman, the proprietor of the English and American literature Shakespeare and Co. bookstore, checks her messages on her phone in Paris, Nov. 5, 2020.

Credit:

Francois Mori/AP

Amazon often offers cheap books with fast and free delivery options, making it hard for independent bookstores to compete. The new law regulating delivery fees will put a bit more power back into the hands of indie shops.

Bright Spot?

🚀 Would you hop on a hoverbike — a $680,000 one? If your answer is yes, you might want to check ALI Technologies' XTurismo Limited Edition electric hoverbike now available to order in Japan. It can fly for 40 minutes at up to 60 miles per hour on a single charge! It's just perfect for a short commute. But here is the catch: Current traffic regulations in Japan do not allow hoverbikes to fly over roads. The makers of the vehicle hope this can be of use for rescue teams when needing to reach areas difficult to access.

In case you missed it

Listen: Haiti fuel shortage intensifies

People push and shove as they try to get their tanks filled at a gas station in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021.

People push and shove as they try to get their tanks filled at a gas station in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Sept. 22, 2021. In addition to kidnappings, gangs are blamed for blocking gas distribution terminals and hijacking supply trucks, which officials say has led to a shortage of fuel. 

Credit:

Rodrigo Abd/AP

Haiti is running out of fuel. The severe fuel shortage has intensified because gangs are blockading fuel supplies at ports located in areas controlled by them. And we hear from Osama, who grew up in the West Bank during the first and second intifadas. A chance encounter with a group of Jewish people made him question his own prejudices and he now works for peace. Plus, a court in Madrid has ruled that a couple, now separated, will have joint custody of their dog. The ruling recognized the people as "co-carers” so that Panda, the dog, will now alternate between two homes.

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