A Miami woman tells her story of what it's like to be pregnant with Zika

America Abroad
A woman looks at a Center for Disease Control (CDC) health advisory sign about the dangers of the Zika virus as she lines up for a security screening at Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, U.S., May 23, 2016.

A woman looks at a Center for Disease Control (CDC) health advisory sign about the dangers of the Zika virus as she lines up for a security screening at Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, U.S., May 23, 2016. 

Photo by Carlo Allegri / Reuters. 

Sara lives in Miami Beach, Florida, and works in TV. She asks that we not use her real name because she and her husband haven’t told everyone in their family that during her pregnancy, she was infected with Zika.

They just found out at the beginning of October and she’s due in three weeks.

Like most people infected with the virus, Sarah never experienced any symptoms.

On August 19, Florida Governor Rick Scott confirmed that Zika was spreading in Miami Beach. Sara wasn’t in Florida at the time, but when she got back her OB/GYN recommended she get tested. Sara needed time to figure out how to pay for the test, as it wasn’t covered by her insurance, and once she got it, it took weeks for the results to come back. The news came on Oct. 7 — she was positive.  

“He told me that I had tested positive for the Zika Virus, but that there was still a possibility — that there could be a false positive,” Sara says.

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