Zeynep Tufekci

A group of people leave flowers outside a building with signs table to a column that say "#turntolove" and "#love will win terror will lose"

New Zealand shooting video was 'made to make us watch it.' This professor says don't.

The shooter who killed 49 in New Zealand broadcast 17 minutes of his attack on Facebook. Watching and sharing videos like this inspire future killers and is disrespectful to victims, says a technology professor.

New Zealand shooting video was 'made to make us watch it.' This professor says don't.
Activity using Strava's tracking technologies such as the one above has helped the company produce a heat map of the world using one billion total activities.

Recent discovery on Strava heat map points out the ease of leaking data through social media platforms

Recent discovery on Strava heat map points out the ease of leaking data through social media platforms
Protest

The potential — and possible pitfalls — of modern protests

The potential — and possible pitfalls — of modern protests
Youth in Istanbul, Turkey protest the results of a referendum on their president's powers.

Turks vote by a slim margin to expand their president's powers, and dissent erupts on social media

Turks vote by a slim margin to expand their president's powers, and dissent erupts on social media
UNC professor Zeynep Tufekci says Facebook is offering the news equivalent of Halloween candy.

How to stop Facebook when its newsfeed 'serves Halloween candy for breakfast, lunch and dinner'

How to stop Facebook when its newsfeed 'serves Halloween candy for breakfast, lunch and dinner'
Activists in Turkey are silhouetted against a screen showing President Tayyip Erdogan during a pro-government demonstration in Ankara, Turkey, July 17, 2016.

Turkish authorities owe their very survival to the free press they attempt to throttle

When Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wanted to reach out to those who opposed the attempted coup last week, he didn't dial-in to a government-supported media outlet.

Turkish authorities owe their very survival to the free press they attempt to throttle
Zeynep Tufekci at SXSW 2015.

'Power in numbers' is more than a phrase — it's a vital part of social change

Like many people in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, social scientist Zeynep Tufekci was shocked by the killing of three Muslim students there in February. At a hastily organized vigil the following night, she was reminded of the power of community in addressing problems.

'Power in numbers' is more than a phrase — it's a vital part of social change
SafeMode conversation with Zeynep

8 things we learned about activism in Marco Werman’s conversation with Zeynep Tufekci at SXSW

We need to be moving to a model where activists demand "no representation without conversation," said Zeynep Tufekci in a discussion about privacy, social media censorship, hashtag activism and global youth protests at the South by Southwest festival in Austin.

8 things we learned about activism in Marco Werman’s conversation with Zeynep Tufekci at SXSW
SafeMode at SXSW

The World explores youth activism at SXSW

Gezi Park. Tahrir Square. Hong Kong. Ferguson. What form is youth activism taking and how is it different from what came before? The World brings you a multimedia experience from South by Southwest in Austin as part of our #SafeMode series.

The World explores youth activism at SXSW
Mohamed was important in Libyan's revolution, helping to defeat and ultimately capture Muammar Gaddafi. His younger brother missed out on Libya's revolution — so he decided to make his own fame by going to Syria to fight in the violent revolution there.

2014 was the year youth protesters found their voice and hacking became an everyday fear

From the Sony hack to #BringBackOurGirls, here are the top international security, privacy, digital diplomacy online activism and cyber-warfare stories of 2014.

2014 was the year youth protesters found their voice and hacking became an everyday fear
A pro-democracy protester carries a yellow umbrella, symbol of the Occupy Central civil disobedience movement, while gathering with other protesters at Mong Kok shopping district in Hong Kong on November 27, 2014.

Hong Kong's leaderless protests may mark a new evolution in leadership

Just who runs protests in places like Kiev and Hong Kong? It's not an easy question to answer, but that doesn't mean the protest movements in those places lack energy or direction. In fact, their loose structure may be a new model for political organization.

Hong Kong's leaderless protests may mark a new evolution in leadership
AC Milan's Michael Essien takes part in a training session at the Vicente Calderon stadium in Madrid on March 10, 2014, ahead of a UEFA Champions League match against Atlético Madrid.

Soccer star Michael Essien doesn't have Ebola — so who started the rumor that he did?

False rumors briefly spread this week that Ghanaian soccer star Michael Essien had Ebola. But what actually happens if someone spreads a lie like that on the Internet? Not much, as it turns out.

Soccer star Michael Essien doesn't have Ebola — so who started the rumor that he did?
Facebook

Many hated how Facebook manipulated personal emotions. The one group that didn't? Dictators

Many Facebook users were upset the company experimented on the emotional states of 689,000 users without their consent. For dictators, this just gave them more fodder to convince the public Facebook is evil.

Many hated how Facebook manipulated personal emotions. The one group that didn't? Dictators
A protester at Trocadero Square near the Eiffel Tower in Paris demonstrates against  the kidnapping of school girls in Nigeria.

Could all the attention to #BringBackOurGirls backfire and empower Boko Haram?

The abducted Nigerian girls remain front-and-center for the international media. But Zeynep Tufekci of University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill warns that all the global attention could backfire and end up empowering Boko Haram.

Could all the attention to #BringBackOurGirls backfire and empower Boko Haram?
Two young women walk down a street while talking on the phone.

So why aren't young Americans spooked by NSA surveillance?

Around the world, revelations about NSA spying have caused outrage and protests. But not so much in the US. In fact, older Americans seem more worried than digitally plugged-in youth, whose electronic lives are being monitored. One researcher says young people don't seem so worried about the government acting as Big Brother.

So why aren't young Americans spooked by NSA surveillance?