Chelsea Manning

Kristinn Hrafnsson, editor in chief of Wikileaks, and barrister Jennifer Robinson talk to the media outside the Westminster Magistrates Court after WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was arrested in London, Britain, April 11, 2019.

What does Assange's arrest mean for press freedom?

Carrie Cordero, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and law professor, spoke with The World’s host Marco Werman about what might happen next in the case — and what Assange's arrest means for news organizations publishing national security stories.

What does Assange's arrest mean for press freedom?
Assange

A decade of WikiLeaks' Assange, from allegations to arrest

A decade of WikiLeaks' Assange, from allegations to arrest
Chelsea Manning pictured in a photograph published to her Twitter account on May 18.

Harvard called 'cowardly' for rescinding offer to Chelsea Manning after pressure from veterans

Harvard called 'cowardly' for rescinding offer to Chelsea Manning after pressure from veterans
People hold signs calling for the release of imprisoned whistleblower Chelsea Manning in San Francisco, 2015

How Chelsea Manning went from antisecrecy activist to transgender idol

How Chelsea Manning went from antisecrecy activist to transgender idol
The World

Here's your chance to stand next to Julian Assange — kind of

Here's your chance to stand next to Julian Assange — kind of
Jennifer is a transgender Army veteran who began making her transition into a woman while she was deployed to Afghanistan.

Transitioning to being a woman while serving in Afghanistan was like 'puberty in a combat zone'

Jennifer was once named Edward, a hard-boiled Army sergeant and career soldier in the infantry. But now that her service is done and she's transitioned to being a woman, DOD policies keep her from taking full advantage of veterans benefits unless she reveals that she has transitioned from the other gender.

Transitioning to being a woman while serving in Afghanistan was like 'puberty in a combat zone'

Manning's safety in question as a transgendered person in military prison

U.S. soldier Bradley Manning was recently sentenced to 35 years in military prison for leaking state secrets, but one day later shocked many by coming out as transgendered. Manning, who asked to be referred to as Chelsea going forward, may find support for her new identity difficult to come by in Army prison.

Manning's safety in question as a transgendered person in military prison