Bosnia and Herzegovina

Migrants from the Middle East and elsewhere rest on the ground as they gather at the Belarus-Poland border near Grodno, Belarus

Polish border police push back migrants at Belarus border

Polish riot police push back hundreds of migrants at the border with Belarus. Also, rich and poor nations try to resolve differences at the COP 26 climate conference in Glasgow. And, Malawi elects its first MP with albinism.

Polish border police push back migrants at Belarus border
Bosnian Serb member of the tripartite Presidency of Bosnia Milorad Dodik holds a speech during the 4th Budapest Demographic Summit in Budapest, Hungary

Bosnia faces the most serious crisis since the Balkans War, analyst says

Bosnia faces the most serious crisis since the Balkans War, analyst says
A man holds a flag and sticks his arm out of a car window, smiling and celebrating.

Montenegro was a success story in troubled Balkan region – now its democracy is in danger

Montenegro was a success story in troubled Balkan region – now its democracy is in danger
A medical worker gives a shot of the Chinese Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine to a woman during the vaccination in Belgrade, Serbia, Feb. 17, 2021. 

Serbia lets people choose their COVID-19 vaccine. Some call it a ‘political ballot.’

Serbia lets people choose their COVID-19 vaccine. Some call it a ‘political ballot.’
A woman stands at a memorial.

25 years after Srebrenica massacre, int'l crimes are still difficult to prosecute

25 years after Srebrenica massacre, int'l crimes are still difficult to prosecute
Migrants rest in a dorm destroyed during the Bosnian 1992-1995 war, in Bihac, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 11, 2018.

Bosnia emerges as new underground migrant route while Europe’s borders tighten

Bosnia, a small mountainous country with a population of around 3.5 million, recorded only 775 migrant arrivals for the whole of 2017. The country's minister of security said that 7,128 migrants had been registered since the beginning of 2018.

Bosnia emerges as new underground migrant route while Europe’s borders tighten
poison in The Hague

Convicted war criminal drinks 'poison' in court, dies

A Bosnian Croat wartime commander has died after ingesting 'poison' after a verdict was upheld at The Hague.

Convicted war criminal drinks 'poison' in court, dies
A Bosnian Muslim woman and child cry near the coffin of their relative, which is one of the 175 coffins of newly identified victims from the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, in the Potocari Memorial Center, near Srebrenica, July 10, 2014.

Young Bosnians react to Mladić conviction

The conviction of former Bosnian Serbian commander Ratko Mladić divided people in his former home country.

Young Bosnians react to Mladić conviction
A woman writes in a book inside a traveling monument called 'Prijedor 92' outside the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal (ICTY

What does justice in the former Yugoslavia look like 25 years later?

International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) — created by the UN in 1993 to address war crimes during the Bosnian war — has issued its last conviction.

What does justice in the former Yugoslavia look like 25 years later?
Sutherland Springs in Sutherland Springs, Texas, November 8, 2017

When trying to determine why the US has so many mass shootings, only one statistic matters

Why does the US have so many mass shootings. A criminologist turned to data science for an answer, comparing the US with 170 other countries.

When trying to determine why the US has so many mass shootings, only one statistic matters
Portrait of man, outdoors

Muslim refugees of another era could put Missouri in play for Clinton

If Missouri’s race is as close as recent polls suggest, some observers think it could be St. Louis’ “Bosnian vote” that gives the state’s 10 electoral votes to Hillary Clinton.

Muslim refugees of another era could put Missouri in play for Clinton
The Kouachi brothers gesture after shooting up the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris last week.

Where did the Paris attackers get their guns?

The attacks in Paris last week were carried out with automatic weapons, including a variant of the AK47. These kinds of weapons are very difficult to obtain legally anywhere in the European Union, which has led many to wonder where the accused attackers got their weapons.

Where did the Paris attackers get their guns?
A female Celebes crested macaque takes a photo of herself using David Slater's camera during a photography trip in Indonesia in 2011. There is a legal dispute under way as to who owns the photograph.

Does the monkey who took her own picture have a copyright — or does the photographer who owns the camera?

When David Slater went to Indonesia, he wanted to get the perfect monkey photo. Well, he got it — but the monkey actually took the photo. So who has the copyright? That story tops our Global Scan.

Does the monkey who took her own picture have a copyright — or does the photographer who owns the camera?
People put up a poster of Gavrilo Princip, the 19-year-old Bosnian Serb who gunned down Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914 and lit the fuse for World War One. The banner says "We Are All Gavrilo."

Why are world maps being rewritten? Consult a book on World War I

In the Middle East, Africa and even possibly the United States, the world created by World War I is starting to unravel. Now resurrecting that century-old history may be the best guide to understanding modern wars.

Why are world maps being rewritten? Consult a book on World War I
Kosovars wave Albanian flags while celebrating their declaration of independence from Serbia in Pristina, Kosovo, on Feb. 17, 2008.

Why World War I still matters, 100 years after it began

One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh hour" still shape many of today's conflicts. From ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls, GlobalPost co-founder Charles Sennott journeys from Iraq to Nigeria to the Balkans to Northern Ireland and the Holy Land to see how WWI's history lives on, the lessons learned — and far too often not learned.

Why World War I still matters, 100 years after it began