Chibok

Oby Ezekwesili, Bring Back Our Girls campaigner, speaks during a news conference

Beset by school violence, US and Nigeria consider each other's experience

In the wake of another attack on girls at a Nigerian school, parents in Nigeria are looking at how the US responds to the latest American school shooting.

Beset by school violence, US and Nigeria consider each other's experience
Members of the #BringBackOurGirls (#BBOG) campaign embrace each other at a sit-out in Abuja, Nigeria May 18, 2016.

The Chibok girls are still in custody, and their parents are still desperate

The Chibok girls are still in custody, and their parents are still desperate
Members of the "Bring Back Our Girls" campaign celebrate news that Boko Haram extremists have released 21 young captives.

Nigeria's #BringBackOurGirls campaign celebrates 21 returnees

Nigeria's #BringBackOurGirls campaign celebrates 21 returnees
Amina Ali Darsha Nkeki, a Nigerian schoolgirl rescued after over two years of captivity with Boko Haram militants, presents her child to President Muhammadu Buhari in Abuja, Nigeria May 19, 2016.

Rescued Chibok girl meets with Nigerian president

Rescued Chibok girl meets with Nigerian president
BringBackOurGirls campaigners

Nigerian president offers talks to ‘Bring Back Our Girls’

Nigerian president offers talks to ‘Bring Back Our Girls’
BringBackOurGirls campaigners

Boko Haram militants take over Chibok in northeastern Nigeria

Boko Haram has attacked the Nigerian town where they kidnapped more than 200 schoolgirls earlier this year. Locals say the militants are now in control.

Boko Haram militants take over Chibok in northeastern Nigeria
Women react during a protest demanding that Nigerian security forces search harder for 200 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist militants.

Nigerian girls who escaped from Boko Haram describe their ordeal

The fate of Nigeria's missing schoolgirls is still unknown, six months after their abduction by the Islamist militant group, Boko Haram. But a number of girls who evaded or escaped from Boko Haram have described their ordeal to Human Rights Watch

Nigerian girls who escaped from Boko Haram describe their ordeal
Hauwa Nkaki, mother of one of more than 200 girls abducted in the remote village of Chibok.

In 100 days since the mass abduction of Nigerian schoolgirls, 11 of the girls' parents have died

It's been 100 days since the militant group Boko Haram kidnapped more than 200 Nigerian school girls. Since the abductions, at least 11 of the girls' parents have died. President Goodluck Jonathan met today with some of the surviving parents,as Nigerian journalist Chude Jideonwo explains

In 100 days since the mass abduction of Nigerian schoolgirls, 11 of the girls' parents have died
Malala Yousafzai during trip to Nigeria July 2014

Malala, the girl who survived a Taliban shooting, is in Nigeria to support its kidnapped girls

17-year old Malala Yousafzai was herself a victim of terrorism, when a Taliban hitman tried to kill her for supporting girls' education in Pakistan. Today, she met with Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan and relatives of the kidnapped girls to add her voice, and pressure, to the call of "bring back our girls."

Malala, the girl who survived a Taliban shooting, is in Nigeria to support its kidnapped girls
What's left of the state boarding school in Chibok, a remote town in northeast Nigeria Borno State. On April 14, Boko Haram militants raided the school on April 14th in search of food. They found the girls and kidnapped them. More than 200 are still missi

The town where the Nigerian girls were kidnapped is the heartland of Boko Haram

The school the Nigerian girls were kidnapped from is in a remote corner of northeast Nigeria. It's so remote that it takes three days by car to get there. Once you get there, you'll find yourself in the heartland of Boko Haram.

The town where the Nigerian girls were kidnapped is the heartland of Boko Haram
Protesters in Lagos demanding the release of abducted teenage school girls from the remote Nigerian village of Chibok.

How the abduction of more than 200 teenage girls is uniting Nigerian Christians and Muslims

A US team of military advisers is on the ground in Nigeria to help in the search for more than 200 schools girls abducted more than three weeks ago. Fatima Zanna Gana — one of the leaders of Nigeria's #BringBackOurGirls campaign — says some Nigerians are worried about just what the international presence will mean.

How the abduction of more than 200 teenage girls is uniting Nigerian Christians and Muslims
Women react during a protest demanding security forces to search harder for 200 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist militants.  REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Nigerians demand that their government do something to #BringBackOurGirls

More than 200 teenage girls are still missing after Boko Haram Islamic militants reportedly abducted them two weeks ago. And Nigerians across the country are using protests and social media to demand that the government do something to bring the girls back.

Nigerians demand that their government do something to #BringBackOurGirls
A man weeps with parents of kidnapped school girls abducted by Islamist militants.  Some 230 girls are still missing, a much higher figure than authorities originally said had been kidnapped.

Nigerians fear kidnapped school girls have been taken abroad

Local leaders in Nigeria's northeast say there have been reports of gunmen crossing into Cameroon and Chad with some of the more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped two weeks ago. Nigerian author Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani says the tragedy is uniting Nigerians of diverse ethnicities and religions.

Nigerians fear kidnapped school girls have been taken abroad
Abuja residents react as victims of a bomb blast arrive at a local hospital this week.

Why Nigeria's government can't prevent the kidnapping of 100 teenage school girls

Violence in northern Nigeria took an ominous turn this week when at least 100 teenage girls were kidnapped from a school in the remote northeast. It's thought that the Islamist militant group Boko Haram took the young women to a forest near the border with Cameroon. Omoyele Sowore of Sahara Reporters blames what he calls an "incompetent" Nigerian government.

Why Nigeria's government can't prevent the kidnapping of 100 teenage school girls