Abuja

A man used his mobile phone to read headline news on Twitter inside an office in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, June 7, 2021.

Nigeria's indefinite Twitter ban sounds the alarm on free speech

Nigerian writers Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani and Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún weigh in on Nigeria's decision to indefinitely ban Twitter after the platform deleted a controversial tweet by the president.

Nigeria's indefinite Twitter ban sounds the alarm on free speech
A man is shown bending over in the back of a delivery truck lifting a burlap bag.

How Africa risks reeling from a health crisis to a food crisis

How Africa risks reeling from a health crisis to a food crisis
Malala

Malala calls for a 'state of emergency for education' in Nigeria

Malala calls for a 'state of emergency for education' in Nigeria
Members of the "Bring Back Our Girls" campaign celebrate news that Boko Haram extremists have released 21 young captives.

Nigeria's #BringBackOurGirls campaign celebrates 21 returnees

Nigeria's #BringBackOurGirls campaign celebrates 21 returnees
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

In Nigeria, many stayed up late for the drama, not the content of the US presidential debate

In Nigeria, many stayed up late for the drama, not the content of the US presidential debate
In a market in Abuja, a vendor named Abba shows me a puny tomato that was selling for 10 times the usual price. Some Nigerians have been calling tomatoes “Buhari’s gold,” after the president.

How a tomato shortage has Nigerians questioning their reliance on oil

Tomatoes are a prized staple in Nigeria, but there's a severe shortage and prices are soaring. At first, many people has conspiracy theories about what caused the shortage.

How a tomato shortage has Nigerians questioning their reliance on oil
Nigerians are speculating that when President Muhammadu Buhari visits the White House on July 20th President Obama will try to persuade the African leader to repeal Nigeria's Same Sex Prohibition Law.

Nigerians fear Obama will push gay rights in the White House during meeting with nation's new leader

The legalization of gay marriage in the US has sparked increased homophobia in Nigeria. Now fear is growing that Obama may bring up the issue during the Nigerian president's trip to the White House later this month.

Nigerians fear Obama will push gay rights in the White House during meeting with nation's new leader
A bus advertising an American visa lottery in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos.

Nigerians vie for a life-changing slip of paper

When immigrants are granted visas, their lives are transformed, and so are the lives of the circle of people around them.

Nigerians vie for a life-changing slip of paper
A girl and her mother rescued from Boko Haram in Sambisa Forest by Nigeria's military arrive at a camp for the displaced.

An uncertain welcome awaits hundreds of Nigerian women and girls freed from Boko Haram captivity

Nigeria's military has secured the release of hundreds of women and girls captured by Boko Haram. Many of those rescued are pregnant.

An uncertain welcome awaits hundreds of Nigerian women and girls freed from Boko Haram captivity
A schoolgirl walks past campaign posters in support of Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan along a road in Ikoyi district in Lagos.

'Digital thuggery' comes to the forefront in Nigeria's elections

Nigeria's presidential election is the most hotly contested in the country since the end of military rule in 1999. Nigerian author Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani says the election is being fought online, where legions of paid staff are inundating sites with fabricated postings and comments.

'Digital thuggery' comes to the forefront in Nigeria's elections
The World

How a Chicago bluegrass band rocked Nigeria's music scene

Bluegrass covers of pop and rock music abound abound. But none have quite the back story of The Henhouse Prowlers' version of "Chop My Money,"a cover of a Nigerian hip-hop mega-hit that created a frenzy in the country when the band toured there this summer.

How a Chicago bluegrass band rocked Nigeria's music scene
Hauwa Nkaki, mother of one of more than 200 girls abducted in the remote village of Chibok.

In 100 days since the mass abduction of Nigerian schoolgirls, 11 of the girls' parents have died

It's been 100 days since the militant group Boko Haram kidnapped more than 200 Nigerian school girls. Since the abductions, at least 11 of the girls' parents have died. President Goodluck Jonathan met today with some of the surviving parents,as Nigerian journalist Chude Jideonwo explains

In 100 days since the mass abduction of Nigerian schoolgirls, 11 of the girls' parents have died
Malala Yousafzai during trip to Nigeria July 2014

Malala, the girl who survived a Taliban shooting, is in Nigeria to support its kidnapped girls

17-year old Malala Yousafzai was herself a victim of terrorism, when a Taliban hitman tried to kill her for supporting girls' education in Pakistan. Today, she met with Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan and relatives of the kidnapped girls to add her voice, and pressure, to the call of "bring back our girls."

Malala, the girl who survived a Taliban shooting, is in Nigeria to support its kidnapped girls
The #bringbackourgirls campaign continues to resonate globally.  Students from an all-girls Catholic school in Manila wore masks last month in solidarity with the kidnapped African school girls.

Nigerians still hope for a rescue of their kidnapped girls, even as abductions continue

As hundreds of Nigerian girls remain in the hands of Boko Haram, the government's response remains confused and inadequate to many. Journalist Chude Jideonwo told PRI's The World that the government even tried to ban demonstrations in support of the girls.

Nigerians still hope for a rescue of their kidnapped girls, even as abductions continue
Chibok girl's school uniforms from three of the kidnapped girls.

These photos show the missing Nigerian girls as real people, as individuals

It's been a month an a half since hundreds of Nigerian schoolgirls were abducted by the Islamist militant group, Boko Haram. But despite the global attention, we still know very little about the missing girls themselves. Glenna Gordon realized that although she could not photograph the girls, she could photograph their personal possessions as a way to highlight who they are.

These photos show the missing Nigerian girls as real people, as individuals